School News

News for Marion High School


Posted: by Patricia Gibson, Communications Director
News Blog Category - News By Myla Townsend

Marion High School’s vocal and instrumental jazz ensembles earned high marks in state competition earlier this month.

For the first time, MHS band program had two jazz ensembles competing in the Indiana State School Music Jazz Competition, which took place March 1 at Kokomo High School.

Jazz Band 1, which features mainly upperclassmen, earned a gold with distinction, the first time an MHS jazz band has earned that extra recognition. In addition, all five soloists received blue ribbons for their improvised solos. The soloists were Isak Lagerkvist, Victor Lee, Travis Metzger, Tristan Galeon, and Saralena Bergsma.

Jazz Band 2 competed for the first time ever and received a silver rating. This jazz combo group, directed by student teacher Zachary Tibbs, features seven freshmen and one sophomore.

“The thing I was most proud of wasn’t the ratings or the performances but rather the teamwork and support these kids showed each other,” said Josh Huff, director of bands at MHS. “They represented Marion to the highest degree!”

On March 2, the MHS jazz choir, Virtuoso, performed at the ISSMA jazz contest for choral groups — the first time in years that MHS has competed in this competition. Virtuoso received a gold rating, and soloist Lara Short received a blue ribbon.

Congratulations to all of these talented students on these outstanding accomplishments!
Posted: by Patricia Gibson, Communications Director
News Blog Category - News

The Marion High School JROTC Rifle Marksmanship Team demonstrated they are clearly the best Precision Division team within the five states comprising the U.S. Army Cadet Command’s 7th Brigade. Not only did the team win the 7th Brigade Marksmanship Championship, but the Giants also produced the first, second, fifth, and sixth best shooters.



The Marion High School JROTC Precision Marksmanship Team stands with their first-place trophy from the U.S. Army’s 7th Brigade Championship at Ft. Knox, Kentucky in March 2019. Team members included Hailey Teeguarden (front) who was also the match’s top shooter, and (back row) Levi Hofmann, sixth place, Josiah Hamilton, second place, and Abigail Baird, fifth place. The 7th Brigade has 250 JROTC programs from the states of Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Indiana. 


The Marion marksmen soundly defeated all others recently at Fort Knox, Ky., to become the top Precision Division rifle team from within the 250 JROTC programs in the 7th Brigade Cadet Command Brigade, which includes the states of Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Indiana. 

Marion senior Hailey Teeguarden was the match’s top shooter with an impressive score of 290 out of a possible 300. She was joined by Josiah Hamilton (junior) who placed second with a 278, Abigail Baird (junior) with a personal high score of 275, and Levi Hofmann (junior) who also scored a 275. Cadet Baird beat teammate Hofmann by one bulls-eye to capture the fifth place finish.

The Giants beat their next closest competitors by 61 points.

“I really wanted to shoot my best in this match,” Teeguarden said. “This was an important match for us, and the entire team shot very well.”



Abigail Biard, Levi Hoffman, Hailey Teeguarden, and Josiah Hamilton mug for the camera at the 7th Brigade Championship in Fort Knox, Ky.
 

This was the first time the Marion team has ever won the 7th Brigade Championship. This is also the first year the Giants have moved up from the Sporter classification into the Precision category.

“I have to admit I am really surprised at how well the cadets have adapted to shooting in the higher category of Precision,” said retired Lt. Col. David Farlow, the team’s head coach and senior Army instructor for Marion High School JROTC. “It really speaks well of their hard work and dedication to learn the new discipline.”

The precision category is the same level in which collegiate athletes and Olympians compete. It is the top tier within the air rifle competitive categories.

The Giants have three remaining matches, including the Indiana American Legion’s State Championship, which they easily won last year.

Looking toward next year, Farlow said: “I am really excited about the prospects for this team, given we are only going to lose Teeguarden through graduation. Those three juniors, coupled with several sophomores and freshmen on our B Team, have the makings of an even stronger team.”
Posted: by Patricia Gibson, Communications Director
News Blog Category - News Marion High School JROTC cadets Audrey Dickerson and Hailey Teeguarden both were awarded the U.S. Army’s ROTC scholarships. These national level scholarships are each valued at just under $100,000.

     

Students awarded the scholarships can choose to attend any college/university that has an Army ROTC program and the money can be used to pay for tuition, room and board, books, and fees. Additionally, the cadets will receive a monthly stipend to cover incidental costs.

“I was so happy and shocked,” Dickerson said when she learned she was selected for the scholarship. “It is a real honor.” Dickerson will attend Purdue-Fort Wayne in the fall and plans to study engineering.

Teeguarden will attend Indiana Wesleyan University and plans to study nursing.

“My goal is to become an Army nurse and serve on active duty,” Teeguarden said. “I am so thankful for this scholarship as it will help me achieve my goal.”

The Army evaluates scholarship applicants on their academic performance, athletic achievements, and demonstrated leadership.

The scholarship recipients must enroll in ROTC for all four years of college. Upon graduation, they will be commissioned as second lieutenants in the U.S. Army and have to serve either on active duty or in the reserve components of the Army (Army Reserves or National Guard).

Approximately 9,000 high school seniors apply each year for the Army ROTC scholarships. Only about 2,000 scholarships are awarded each year.

“These two cadets are simply outstanding,” said retired Lt. Col. David Farlow, the senior Army instructor for Marion High School. “They are indicative of the quality scholastic leaders our program is producing.”

The Marion High JROTC program is in its eighth year and has produced seven cadets who have been awarded ROTC Scholarships in the last five years.
Posted: by Patricia Gibson, Communications Director
Posted: by Patricia Gibson, Communications Director
News Blog Category - News Some of best young musicians in the area will gather together for a special performance as the Grant County Public High School Honor Band this week.

The public is invited to come out and enjoy this special performance, set for 7 p.m. Thursday, March 14, in Indiana Wesleyan University’s Chapel Auditorium in Marion. Admission is free!

The Grant County Honor Band will feature some of the top music students at each of Grant County’s five public high schools, Eastbrook, Madison-Grant, Marion, Mississinewa, and Oak Hill. It will also feature a distinguished guest conductor, who will help the musicians hone their skills as they prepare for a special performance. This year’s guest conductor is Michael Flanagin, Director of Bands and chairman of the Division of Music at Indiana Wesleyan University.

Band directors from all five schools have been collaborating to make this opportunity possible for the talented young musicians around the county.

“Establishing this event as a local tradition is something that gives our students ownership and something to take pride in,” said Eastbrook High School Director of Bands Joel Walters. “I am looking forward to this year, as students who are participating for their second year have made friendships with students from the other schools, and I look forward to seeing students continue to get to know one another.”

Ryan Wamhoff, director of bands at Oak Hill High School, echoed that, noting that his students were excited that the event was returning.

“Last year's first ever Grant County Honor Band was a tremendous success,” he said. “My students enjoyed the experience of performing with peers from around the county and found the music challenging and fun. Every one of my returning students who participated last year applied to be a part of it again this year plus many more, I think that is a testament to its success.”

It’s something that the educators know can have a lifelong impact.

“Our students talked about the Grant County Honor Band more than any other honor band they'd been a part of. When you interact with students from your own county, there's always the possibility of building friendships. We know with social media there can be a lot of interaction from a distance, but there's nothing like real life interactions with others that can lead to lasting friendships,” said Cindy Walker, assistant director of bands at Mississinewa High School.

Marion High School Director of Bands Josh Huff said the success of the event is just one facet of a flourishing of the arts in Grant County.

“I don't know that 20 years ago you could've said that music education was THRIVING in Grant County,” he said, “but I think you can truly say that today.”

Flanagin, the guest conductor for the event, noted that this flourishing arts culture has a community-wide impact.

“We have a lot of special things going on in Grant County — theater, musical theater, vocal music, instrumental music, visual arts, and more,” he said. “This particular event is not only an opportunity for area high schools, but this also gives our music education students at Indiana Wesleyan University the opportunity to see and hear students from the area as they help out with this event.  If this day can help to further their education, then I consider it a ‘win-win’ for all involved.”

The event brings opportunity not only for the students, but for the educators as well.

“We can share ideas, different pieces, and it gives us a chance to build a network of support,” Huff said. “Professionally, it's awesome to just spend a day with other directors in like-minded situations and brainstorm and talk about the progress of the programs.”

Wamhoff said this has helped elevate all of the directors involved.

“The time spent planning and preparing for each year’s honor band has brought all of us directors together. Now we are a team. We often face similar every day challenges, and we can be a resource for each other when one of needs help or is looking for fresh ideas.”

The real impact, though, goes far beyond music education, Walters noted.

“Music education can be very different than other activities in school, but also has many connections to those other activities,” he said. “The biggest difference is that it allows students to express themselves in ways that they might not normally do. It allows them to be creative while learning how to collaborate with others. I believe it ultimately helps prepare our students for the rest of their lives after they graduate. Students learn how to be excellent musicians, but in the process, they learn discipline, responsibility, creativity, and critical thinking skills.”